Rethinking the Liberal Quaker Jesus 4/4

This is the fourth and final part of ‘Rethinking the Liberal Quaker Jesus’, where I critique early liberal Quaker Edward Grubb’s understanding of Jesus. You can find the first part of the series here. F. Jesus the Jew When we reflect on what Jesus means to us today, we need to ask: How does Jesus… Continue reading Rethinking the Liberal Quaker Jesus 4/4

Rethinking the Liberal Quaker Jesus (3/4)

This is part three of four of ‘Rethinking the Liberal Quaker Jesus’, where I critique early liberal Quaker Edward Grubb’s understanding of Jesus. You can find the first part of the series here. D. The Cross as an example of God’s love A central question about Jesus is ‘what did Jesus’ death achieve?’ Grubb offers… Continue reading Rethinking the Liberal Quaker Jesus (3/4)

Rethinking the Liberal Quaker Jesus (2/4)

This is part two of four of ‘Rethinking the Liberal Quaker Jesus’, where I critique early liberal Quaker Edward Grubb’s understanding of Jesus. You can find the first part of the series here. B. Grubb’s use of the Bible In the previous section, I suggested that Grubb has fallen into the same trap the ‘Lives… Continue reading Rethinking the Liberal Quaker Jesus (2/4)

Rethinking the Liberal Quaker Jesus (1/4)

‘How does Jesus speak to you today?’ (Advices & Queries No.4) Who is Jesus and why does he matter? Who do Quakers in Britain say Jesus is? A more technical way of asking this is: what is a liberal Quaker Christology? In this series of four blog posts, I’ll offer some thoughts to help us… Continue reading Rethinking the Liberal Quaker Jesus (1/4)

James Cone’s ‘A Black Theology of Liberation’ and white liberal Quakerism

Every now and again I encounter a book that gives me such a jolt it demands to be talked about. I've just finished James Cone's 'A Black Theology of Liberation', first published in 1970, and it has stirred me up. I found it both exciting and disturbing, and I need to process what I've read.… Continue reading James Cone’s ‘A Black Theology of Liberation’ and white liberal Quakerism

What is ‘that-of-God in everyone’?

I suspect you only need to spend a short time with British Quakers before you hear the phrase ‘that of God in every one’. It may take a much longer time before someone tells you what they think it means. In this post I’ll explore how the meaning of this phrase has changed, and what I think it means by way of theologian Jürgen Moltmann and the idea of God’s ‘Shekinah’.